Winter Garden Ramblings

 

 

 

Gardner

 

A funny thing happened this Christmas. We bought someone a small window sill  propagator for a present and it cost a fiver. We also got a bumper pack of 32 profiteroles for £5. The connection? The packaging for the profiteroles was almost identical to the propagator. So the way that I look at it, you might as well get the profiteroles for nothing. Sadly it is unacceptable giving someone an empty profiterole box for Christmas, a full one would probably be OK. On the other hand you could ask why the propagator cost so much? I am trying to find a use for empty wine bottles to make my joy complete.

 

What to do with your old Christmas Tree? You could try to get it in the garden waste bin, or chip it and use it as garden mulch. I think that they should be left outside for a few weeks to dry out in the garden then ceremonially burnt. It is a bit like the Green Man who dies at the end of the year to be reborn for the new year. The burning of the tree symbolises the end of Yule and the looking forward to the Spring.

 

The long cold spell before Xmas was difficult for everyone. It reminds us gardeners that mother nature is always in charge. Trying to grow plants in the garden that are not hardy isnít a winner. The mistake is putting them in as a main feature, itís fine to include them for some added interest round the edges. But something like a palm in the centre of the lawn can leave a big hole if it succumbs to the cold.

 

I am often asked at this time of year: ĎIs it safe to plant things in this cold weather?í and the answer that I was always taught is that it is OK as long as the ground isnít frozen. But why? Well the first reason is you canít get the spade into the ground when it is frozen. Secondly plants can be damaged very easily when frozen. A root or branch that would normally bend will snap quite easily when frozen.

 

Oh! A Happy New Year.

 

 

 

 

 

Don Morgan,  Morgans Nursery

Stonehouse Lane, Bulkeley

Nr. Malpas, Cheshire, SY14 8BQ

Tel: 01829 720514.

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