Layering

(or the easy way to propagate new plants)

 

 

 

If you have a shrub in your garden that you particularly like and you would want another one. You could take a few cuttings and hope that they root, (if you donít forget to water them).

 

Now for the easy method. What you do is choose a stem of the shrub close to the ground and scratch the bark a few of inches from the tip. Then bury the damaged section just under the surface of the border. Put a stone over it or peg it down to stop it moving then forget about it.

 

Next Spring when you come out of hibernation go and have a look, if you canít move it easily some roots will probably have formed. So you cut the stem between the parent plant and the new layered plant and leave it for a while to establish a decent root system. After it has been growing for a month or two move it to its new home being careful to keep as much soil with the roots as you can.

 

If you want to be clever you bury a pot in the ground under the branch so that the damaged section of stem is buried in it. Then when you want to move your new shrub it is already potted up.

 

This method works best on shrubs. It would work on trees except the branches are a bit too far from the ground. Conifers will root just the same, but sadly their lower branches donít make very good specimens.

 

Ah But! You are thinking your new shrub looks lop sided. There is no reason why you can not turn the shoot round so that it points up in the air. Or it will grow to its normal shape in time.

 

Well I have just done myself out of a bit more business.

 

 

 

 

Don Morgan,  Morgans Nursery

Stonehouse Lane, Bulkeley

Nr. Malpas, Cheshire, SY14 8BQ

Tel. 01829 720514 

Web Site: www.hedgeit.co.uk

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